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Scribblory Writers Library

Your virtual library of true stories has come to this site!

Scribblory Writers Library shelters short true-to-life stories written by the memoirists of Scribblory Writers Group. This virtual library started in 2020, at the outset of COVID-19 pandemic. While the world was losing many lives, we held our pens and preserved life stories.

Are the write-ups here too few to quell the thirst of the reader in you? Head out to our old site and read some more.

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Combing Blond Hair

World Health Day
Embracing Balance and Well-Being

Written by Nichelle Dizon

April 7, 2024

Last Friday, my mom had the urge to comb my hair for some reason. Well, I'm not really conscious when it comes to fixing my hair, but that's one thing my mom can't stand. 

 

While she was combing my hair, she suddenly screamed in horror. Her voice sounded shocked to the core and she went hysterical. I was then surprised, wondering if my head turned into a monster or something, or if she was just over-exaggerating. She told me that I didn't have hair on one part of my head. Despite hearing it from her, I tried to stay calm because she was already panicking. I didn't know what it looked like because, of course, I could not see my head. On the same day, we went to a doctor and received the diagnosis. The doctor said that the cause of my hair loss was stress and a low immune system.

 

Stress? I'm not stressed—or am I? Low immune system? Well, for sure, I was getting stressed with the medications that I'm sure I needed to buy. But during that moment in the doctor's clinic, I took a chance to think about the pauses the doctor made as she wrote on her prescription pad. I asked myself the question, “Am I stressed? Is my stress really that bad for me to get this type of hair loss?” She gave me medications, and we went home.

I could not be stressed. That's for sure. But I kept thinking in my alone moments about what my stressors were. Was the stuff I was thinking about really too much? I also got confused about how I would balance stress before my next visit so that my hair would grow. I felt confused, sad, and lost. At the same time, I didn't want to entertain those emotions because I might’ve ended up getting really stressed.

 

As I write this, there are still a lot of things going on in my head. I’m wondering about how much more self-care I should be giving to myself. My body is now doing the talking, telling me my limits and reminding me what normal health means. There is still a lot to process, but one thing is for sure: this experience has reminded me to go back to my inner core and to live a balanced life.

Image by Dose Juice

World Health Day
Navigating Life with Diabetes: Challenges, Lessons, and Lifestyle Changes

Written by Alfred Pagunsan Gadayan

April 7, 2024

Living with diabetes is like sailing a ship on a stormy sea. The challenges are numerous, but each hurdle crossed brings with it a lesson learned and a change to be made for better health and quality of life.

 

One of the primary challenges I faced was accepting the diagnosis. The realization that I had a chronic condition that required lifelong management was daunting. It took time, but I learned that acceptance is the first step towards taking control. I understood that diabetes isn't a death sentence, but a condition that can be managed with the right lifestyle changes.

 

The daily management of diabetes was another challenge. Maintaining a balance between medication, diet, and exercise was not easy. I had to learn to be disciplined, consistent, and patient. It was a lesson in self-care and responsibility. I learned to listen to my body, to understand its signals, and to respond appropriately. I discovered the importance of regular check-ups and timely medication.

 

A significant change I made was in my diet. I had to let go of my love for sweets and fast food. Instead, I learned to embrace a diet rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, lean proteins, and healthy fats. I learned the importance of portion control and regular meal timings. I realized that a balanced diet is not just crucial for managing diabetes, but it also enhances overall health and well-being.

Physical activity became an integral part of my life. I learned that regular exercise helps control blood sugar levels, reduces the risk of heart disease, and improves mental health. I started with simple activities like walking and gradually included strength training and yoga in my routine.

Another challenge was dealing with the emotional impact of diabetes. The constant worry about blood sugar levels, the fear of complications, and the stress of managing the condition took a toll on my mental health. I learned the importance of mental well-being in managing a chronic condition like diabetes. I started practicing mindfulness and meditation to cope with stress. I also learned to reach out for help when needed—be it from my healthcare provider, support groups, or my loved ones.

Perhaps the most significant lesson I learned was the importance of self-compassion. I learned to forgive myself for the occasional slip-ups, to celebrate small victories, and to be kind to myself during tough times.

 

Living with diabetes has taught me resilience, discipline, and the importance of self-care. It has made me more mindful of my health and lifestyle. The journey hasn't been easy, but the lessons learned and the changes made have undoubtedly improved my health and quality of life.

 

In conclusion, diabetes is a challenging condition, but it's also an opportunity to make positive changes in your life. It's about taking one day at a time, learning from each experience, and continually striving for better health and quality of life.

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